tetropolis2I’ve talked about Tetris Syndrome a time or two here in Cliqist but never when actually talking about Tetris itself. People still craze over Tetris to this day – and why wouldn’t they? It’s addictive, challenging, and refines your problem solving. But what if we applied the shape shifting concept of Tetris to a bigger world? Say, for the heck of it, combined Metroid and Tetris to make a beautiful Tetroidvania, eh? Thankfully, some creative people turned this into a reality and that was four man studio, NextGen Pants, makers of Tetropolis.

Tetropolis is a puzzle platformer game without any particular direction to go set in a world that is massive puzzle itself. Players control a strange tetromino that may be flawed in shape (but you’re still beautiful to me!) stuck in a world centered on perfection and block puzzles – in fact, that’s the entirety of the world: shape shifting blocks. Players accumulate additional tetrominos and manipulate the mass tetromino’s shape to navigate around the world. Each shape has an action that is beneficial on the level, such as block form against enemies or a springing line capable of slinging the precious tetromino across the screen. The world is even changeable through control points which allow the players to relocate rooms for the mass puzzle overall.

tetropolis1NextGen Pants has created a demo for Tetropolis that gathered quite a bit of positive attention at Pax East and the Game Developer’s Conference this year. Tetropolis has been in the works for over a year with the majority of the puzzle work and game mechanics are completed but some additional content needs to be finished. With the $50K earned from the Kickstarter campaign and same amount from OUYA’s #FreeTheGames Fund, the team can work on Tetropolis full time.

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Julie Morley
Julie Morley is a freelance writer and comic artist from Spring, Texas. She attended the Academy of Art University for two years, studying Animation and Illustration. Whilst here, she learned about writing comic scripts, storyboards, and general storytelling. Since leaving college, she has been working on personal comic projects, stories, and illustrations. She aspires to release a self published comic within two years. For the majority of her life, she has been playing console games, typically being third-person shooters and sandboxes. Her favorite game of existence is Dark Cloud II (Dark Chronicle) and her favorite Indie game is Gone Home.
Julie Morley